common list

KARPENKO I. K.

 

Remarks  about  the  chronology  of  Lydia

 

      The  condition  of  sources  dont  permit  us  exactly  restore  dates  of  reign  of  Lydia  Kings,  but  permit  to  input  the  rulling  of  each  king  in  the  concrete  chronological  limits.

      According  to  sources  kings  of  Lydia  ruled:

           (the last  Heraklids):

      According to Evsebius:

           Ardys  Alyattes 36 years1.

           Alyattes 14 years1.

           Meles2 12 years1.

           Candaules 17 years1.

     According  to  Nicholas  of  Damascus3:

           Meles

           Myrsus

           Adyattes  (he  is  Candaules) 3 years.

      According  to   Herodotus4:

           Myrsus

           Myrsilus  Candaules  (the  last  Heraklid).

           (Mermnads):

           Gyg(es) 38 years5

                           36 years6

                           35 years7

           Ardys     49 years8   

                           48 years9                             

                           38 years10

                           37 years11

           Sadyattes   12 years12

                           15 years13

                             5 years14

           Alyattes     57 years15

                           49 years16

                           45 years17

                           44 years18

           Croesus 16 years19

                           15 years20

                           14 years21

       Lets examine the chronology of the last Heraklides.  If we believe the lists, mentioned by Evsebius, Candaules ruled in Lydia during 17 years. He was Meless successor and the last of Heraklids.  According  to  Nicholas  of  Damascus  Adyattes  Candaules,  was  killed  by  Gyges,  and  was  successor  of  his  father, king  Myrsus,  and  ruled  only  for  3  years.

       Myrsus  was  the  successor  of  Meles.

       According  to  Herodotus,  Myrsilus  Candaules  was  the  son  and  successor  of  king  Myrsus.

       So,  we  have  the conclusion  that,  in  Evsebiuss  lists  behind  the  name  of  Candaules  there  were  hidden  two  tsars  Myrsus  and  his  son  Myrsilus (=Adyattes)  and  the  total  sum  of  the  years  they  ruled  was  17.

        Well,  if  Myrsilus (=Adyattes)  ruled  during  3  years,  Myrsus  ruled  during  14 years, (17-3).

Gyg(es)

        According  to  cuneiformal  sources (if  the  calculations  of  H. Tadmor  were  correct)  in  645  B.C.  Gyg(es)  was  alive,  and  by  643/642  he  died  in  the  war  with  Cimmerians22. 

         Indirect  confirmation  of  this  date  is  The  Chronology  of  Apollodorus  and  byzantian  chronologist  Kedren. According  to The  Chronology of  Apollodorus,  tsar  Midas  from  Phrygia  died  the  3rd  year of  Ardyss  rulling23. According  to  Kedren,  Midas  died  when  Amos/Ammon  rulled  in  Judah24.

          Ammon  occupied his  throne  in  642 B.C.  and  died  in  640 B.C. (the  2nd  year  of  his  reign)25.

          Thus,  we  see,  the  3rd  year  of  Ardyss  rulling  was  642/641  or  641/640 B.C.

           If  the  3rd  year  of  Ardyss  rulling  was  642/641 B.C.,  so  Gyg(es)  died  in  644 B.C.;  and  if  the  3rd  year  of  Ardyss  government  was  641/640 B.C.,  Gyg(es)  died  in  643 B.C.

           So, we have  chronological  limits  of  Gyg(es)s  death.

           Gyg(es)  died  in  644  or  643 B.C.  And  we  have  chronological   borders  of  the  beginning  of  Gig(es)s  government,  they  are the  following:  682 B.C. (644 B.C. + 38 the  biggest  figure) of  the  years  of  government  and  678 B.C. (643 B.C. + 35 -  the  smallest  figure  of  the  years  of  government.

            It  is  impossible  to  define  how  many years  Gyg(es)  ruled 35, 36 or 38,  thats  why  we  have  to  consider  all  of  these  three  variants, .. Gyg(es)  occupied  the  throne  of  Lydia  and  overthrew  Myrsilus  (Alyattes)  Candaules  changed  his  father  Myrsus on  the  throne  in  during 685-681 B.C.

            Thus Myrsus  occupied  the  throne  (after  the  Meless  death)  in  during 699-695  B.C.

            Meles  got  the  throne  from  Alyattes  in  during 711-707 B.C.

            Alyattes  changed  Ardys  Alyattes  on  the  throne  in  during 725-721 B.C.

            Ardys  Alyattes  became  the  tsar  in  during 761-757 B.C.        

Ardys

            There  are  two  possible  dates  of  the  conquest  of  Egypt  by  Scythians 643/642 B.C.  and  625/624 B.C.26. But  according  to  The  Chronology  of  Apollodorus  Scythians  invasion  to  Egypt  took  place  when  Ardys  ruled (his  39th year  of  government27,  the  39th  year  of  Ardyss  government  is  mistaken  date.  The  39th  year  is  606/605  or  605/604 B.C. But  it  contradicts  the  date  of  Alyattess  birth  (look  below),  and  thats  why  it  is  mistaken. Another  thing  is  more  important:  Scythians  invasion  to  Egypt  took  place  when  Ardys  ruled. And  as  we  could  understand  Ardys  occupied   the  throne  not  earlier  than  in  644 B.C.,  so,  from  two  possible  dates  of  Scythians  invasion (pointed  above),  we  defined  only  the  second  one 625/624 B.C.  The  evidence  that  Ardys  was  the  tsar  of  Lydia  in  625/624 B.C. came  from  this  information.

Croesus

           Lets  try  to  define  what  year  Croesus  was  at  war  with  Cyrus.

           According  to  Diogenes  Laerty28  Cyrus  died  after  41  years  after  the  death  of  tyrant  Corinth  Periandr.  Thus, we have got if Periandr  died  before  the  beginning  of  the  49th Olympicks  (584 B.C.),  thus Croesus - in 544 B.C.

            According  to  Suda,  Cyrus (Kurash)  occupied  Sardis the  capital  of  Lydia  in the  55th [560-557 B.C.]29, or in  the  58th Olympicks  [548-545 B.C.]30. Thus,  if  Cyrus (Kurash)  defeated  Astyages (Ishtumegu)  only  in  550 B.C.,  accordingly  campaign  to  Lydia  in  the  years of  55th  Olympicks  should  be  excluded. Thats  why  we  have 548-544 B.C.

            We  can  get  more  precise  date  thanks  to  the  biography  of  Thales  of  Miletus,  one  of  the  seven  wise men  in  Ancient  Hellas.

             According  to  Evsebius, Thales of Miletus  died  in  the  58th  Olympicks  [548-545 B.C.]31.

             According   to  received  fragment  from  The  Chronology  of  Apollodorus,  Thales of Miletus  lived  78  years  (according  to  Sosicrat 90 years); he  was  born  in  the  1st  year of  the  35th  Olympicks  [640 B.C.]  and  died  in  the  58th  Olympicks [548-545 B.C.]. Thales  was  alive, when  Croesus  crossed  the river  Halis,  moving against  Persians,  and  he  helped  Croesus  to  cross  this  river  without  constructing the  bridge32.  Diogenes  Laerti,  who  references  the  same  fragment  from Apollodorus,  gives  us  another  date  of  Thaless  birth the 1st  year  of  the  39th  Olympicks [624 B.C.]33.

            Examining  the  both  variants  we could  see  that  if  Thales  was  born  in  640 B.C. (the 1st  year  of  the  35th  Olympicks)  and  died  in  the  58th  Olympicks, he had to  live  92  or  more  years. And  if  Thales  was  born  in  624 B.C. (the 1st  year of  39th    Olympicks),  he  died  at  the  age  of  78  years,  and  in  546 B.C., thus the 3rd  year  of the  58th  Olympicks. So, we  must  agree,  that  the  most  precise  information  of Diogenes  Laerti. And  we  was  able  to  see  from  this evidence  that  Croesus  crossed  the  river  Halis  not  later  than  in  546 B.C.

             According  to  Babylonian  chronicle  7  in  9th  year  of  Nabu-Naid  (= 547  B.C.)  government    In  the  month  Nisan  (March - April)  Kurash (gr. Cyrus), king  of  Parsu  (gr.: Persia) mustered his army and  crossed  the  Tigris  below Arbail.  In  the  month  Iyyar (April - May)  he [marched] to [Lu]d[ddi]  ([Ly]dia). He defeated  its king, took its possessions, (and) stationed  his own garrison (there) []. Then  the  tsar  with  his  garrison  settled  there. 34. Croesus  lost  his  kingdom  at  the  end  of  547 B.C.35. And, althoug  in  most  cases, it  is  incorrect  to  restore  the  name  of  the  country  which  Kurash  wanted  to capture,  but  this  restoring  corresponds  to  the  biography  of  Thales of Miletus.   

              So, Sardis  fell  in  547  B.C.  and  Croesus  died  in  their  storm36,  thus,  Periandr  died  in  588 B.C.  It  was  the  1st  year  of  the  48th  Olympicks.  Probably  Diogenes  Laerti  didnt  know exact  year  of  Periandrs  death,  and  he  limited  by  the  phrase  before  the  beginning of  the  49th  Olympicks,  or  perhaps  military  operations  passed  not  exactly  as  it  was  depicted  by  Herodotus37,  or  as a matter of fact Croesus  was  captured  in  547 B.C.  and  died  in  captivity  in  544 B.C.

              From  above mentioned  information  we  could  understand  that  if  Thales  of Miletus  died  in  546 B.C.,  Sardis  couldnt  fall   later  than  this  date.

               So,  we  received  two  dates  for  the  ending  of  Croesuss  government 547  and  546  B.C.

               From  this  information  followed  that   Croesus  occupied  the  throne  (after  the  death  of  his  father  Alyattes)  in  563 (547 B.C. + 15  years  of  his  government) 540 (546 B.C. +  14  years  of  rulling) B.C.

Sadyattes

              From  three  proposed  variants  of  the  activity  of  Sadyattes  government  variant 5 years is  not  accepted,  because  Sadyattes  was  in  war  with  Miletus  only  6  years38.  What  variant  from  the  rest  two  (12 and 15 years) is  more  correct,  it  is  difficult  to  say.

Alyattes

               The  story  about  marital  affairs  of  Sadyattes  which  Nicholas  of  Damascus39 refered  to,  permitted  us  to  define  when  Alyattes  was  born. According  to  Nicholas  of  Damascus  Alyattes  was  born  in  consequence  of  Sadyattess  marriage  with  his  kindred  sister,  who  was  taken  away  by  force  in  his  cousin  nephew  Milettes.  Sadyattess  sister  had  to  marry  Milettes.  Such  lawless  actions  Sadyattes  could  do  because  he  was  the  tsar. In  the  times  of  Ardys,  Sadyattess  father,  who  married  his  daughter  with  Milettes it  would  be  impossible.

               So,  Alyattes  was  born  not  earlier  than  in  9 months   after  Sadyattes  occupied  the  throne.

               Herodotus  said,  that  Alyattes  ruled  during  57 years.  Together  with  Sadyattes  about  69 years.  However,  560 B.C. + 69 years = 529 B.C. And  its  impossible  because  in  525 B.C.  there  was  the  government  of  Ardys.

               Again,  according  to  Herodotus,  Croesus  occupied  the  throne  when  he  was  35  years  old40  and  he  was  the  eldest son of  Alyattes41. Older  than  he  was  only  his  sister  Arijenia,  who  was  married  Ishtumegu (gr.: Astyages),  the  son  of  Huvahashtra  (gr.: Cyaxares),  the  heir  of  Media  throne  in 585 B.C.42.  And  so  as  Alyattes  was  born  when  his  father  Sadyattes  was  already  the  king,  we  could suppose,  that  those  57  years,  mentioned  by  Herodotus,  were  not  the  years  of  government,  but  the years  of  Alyattess  life.  Then  wed  understand  that  Alyattes  was  born  in  the  period  of  620 617 B.C.,  and  when  Croesus (the  elder  son)  was   born. Alyattes  was  22  years  old.  And  from  the  variants  about  duration  of  Alyattes's  rulling,  proposed  by  some  sources, - the  longest  is 49  years.

                 So,  the  conclusion  is Sadyattess  government  finished,  and  Alyattess  government  began  in  612 (563 B.C. + 49 years  of   Alyattess  government ) 604 (506 B.C. + 44years  of   government) B.C.

                 Taking  into  account  the  peculiarity  of  Alyattess  birthday,  we  had  understood  that  Sadyattes  occupied  the  throne  not  later  than  in  618 B.C.,  and  not   earlier  than  in  624 B.C. (612 B.C. + 15 years  of  government = 627 B.C.,  but  in  625/624 B.C.  was  the  government  of  Ardys).  That  is,  we  have  got  one  more  confirmation  that  57 years is  not  the  duration  of  this  government,  but  the  duration  of  Alyattess  life. But  its  true,  that  Sadyattes  couldnt  occupy  the throne  later  than  in  616 B.C. (604 B.C. + 12 years). Here  are  the  following  chronology  of  tsars  of  Lydia. 

 

Kings

Period  of  engaging  the  throne  (B.C.)

Period  of  death 

(B.C.)

Ardys  Alyattes

761 757

725 721

Alyattes

725 721

711 707

Meles

711 707

699 695

Myrsus

699 695

685 681

Myrsilus (Adyattes) Candaules

685 681

682 678

Gyg(es)

682 678

644 643

Ardys

644 643

624 618

Sadyattes

624 618

612 604

Alyattes

612 604

563 560

Croesus

563 560

547 546

 

     From  this  table  we  can  see  periods  of  reign  of  given  tsars:

             757 725 B.C.       Ardys  Alyattes

             727 711 B.C.       Alyattes

             797 699 B.C.       Meles

             695 685 B.C.       Myrsus  Myrsilus  (Adyattes) Candaules

             678 644 B.C.       Gyg(es)

             543 624 B.C.       Ardys

             618 612 B.C.       Sadyattes43

             604 563 B.C.       Alyattes

             560 547 B.C.       Croesus.

 

Notes:

 

1. Evsebi.Chronicorum libri dvo (Alfred Shoene), vol.1, Berolini, 1875, s. 67-68, Appendix, s. 14, 30, 92.

These  years  probably  contained  3  years  of  Sadyattess  reign,  who  was  left  on  the  throne  by  Meles,  when  he  was  in  Babylon. . , . 6 (.54) // . ., 1960, 3, . 261-262. 

3.  , . 6 (.54-56), . 261-263.

4. . . ., , , 1999, . I, 7.

5. , I, 14.

6. Evsebi, Appendix, s. 14, 92.

7. Evsebi, s.68, Appendix, s. 30.

8. , I, 16.

9. Evsebi, Appendix, s. 14.

10. Evsebi, Appendix, s. 92.

11. Evsebi, s. 68, Appendix, s. 30.

12. , I, 16.

13. Evsebi, Appendix, s. 14, 30, 92.

14. Evsebi, s.68.

15. , I, 25.

16. Evsebi, s. 68, Appendix, s. 92.

17. Evsebi, Appendix, s. 14.

18. Evsebi, Appendix, s. 30.

19. Evsebi, Appendix, s. 92.

20. Evsebi, s. 68, Appendix, s. 14, 30.

21. , I, 86.

22. .. . ., 1996, .110.

23. , .75.

24. , .73.

25. . . ( ). , . 81, 114-115,151,152.

26. . . I . , . 4-5.

27. , .75.

28. . , . ., , 1979, .I, 95 (. 93).

29. . ., , 1989, . I, . 129.  

30. , . 95.

31. , . 106.

32. , . 103.

33. , I, 37 (. 74).

34. Chronicle 7 // Grayson A.K. Assyrian and Babylonian chronicles. Locust-Yalley New-York, 1975, p. 107; . . ., , 2002, .385. Compare  an  interpretation  of  M. A. Dandamaev  (from  ,  . 385)  with  again  his  interpretation  and  explanation  on  p. 23  in  the  book Dandamaev  M.A. In   his  notes  15 p. 270  Dandamaev  expressed  his  supposition  about  the  seizure  of  Sardis  which  took  place  in  545 540 B.C. But  the  biography  of  Thales of Miletus  and  facts  about tyrant of Corinth Periandrs  death,  which  were  not  taken  into  account. The Periandrs death happened for 42 year earlier than the Croesuss death.

35.  According  to  Herodotus,  by the end of this year  Croesus  disbanded  his  army,  intending  to  gather  it  after  5  months  next  year  in  spring.  Kurash  (gr.  Cyrus)  who  suddenly  appeared  near  Sardis,  seized  the  opportunity  and  defeated  Lydian  cavalry  and  during 14  days  took  Sardis. So, Kurash  took  Sardis  approximately  in  November December  of  547 B.C.   , I, 77-84.

36. Such  supposition  is  expressed  by  many  explorers  (investigators). , . 23-24; . . // . ., 1978, 2, . 177-178.

37. , I, 71-85.

38. , I, 18.

39. , . 7 (. 72), . 269.

40. , I, 26.

41. , . 7 (. 74), . 269.

42. , I, 74.

43. Indirect  confirmation  of  Sadyattess  reign  exactly  in  this  period  is  information  about  his  military  operation  with  Huvahastra  (gr. Cyaxares),  the  king  of  Media (, I, 16). It  became  possible  only after  Assyrias  downfall  in  612 B.C. , surely Sadyattes was Assyrian ally after 617 B.C. , because  till  this  year  Media  was  in  the  power of  Scythians ( . . , . 5).

        

.   

1. . . ., , , 1999.

2. .. . ., , . . . -, 1985.

3. . , . ., , 1979.

4. .. . ., 1996.

5. . . ., , 2002.

6. . . ( ). .

7. . . I . .

8. . . // . ., 1978, 2, . 175-178.

9. . . // . ., 1960, 3, . 248-276, 4, . 209-218.  

10. . ., , 1989, . I.  

11. Evsebi.Chronicorum libri dvo (Alfred Shoene), vol.1, Berolini, 1875.

12. Grayson A.K. Assyrian and Babylonian chronicles. Locust-Yalley New-York, 1975.



common list